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Regulatory requests

Uber’s technology connects riders with drivers who operate in a highly regulated sector. Regulatory agencies like the California Public Utilities Commission oversee offline services like electricity, telecom, and water in addition to rideshare trips. They are empowered by law to require rideshare companies to provide information about trips, trip requests, pickup and dropoff areas, fares, vehicles, and drivers in their jurisdictions for a given time period. There is a risk that information like pickup and dropoff locations may allow government agencies—or anyone else who obtains this information—to identify individual riders by associating it with publicly available records. That is why we’ve specified the total number of drivers and riders whose trip details have been reported below.

In some cases, reporting requirements for online companies may differ from or exceed what regulators demand from offline companies. And in other cases, online companies are requested to produce different types of information—like an electronic trip receipt with a trip route instead of a paper log. Both occur because regulators assume that technology companies maintain and therefore should provide these records.

2020 regulatory requests

The tables below show how many riders and drivers were affected by regulatory reporting requirements for our rideshare platform in the US and Canada during the 2020 calendar year.

Please note: values reported have been rounded.

 

United States

2020 regulatory requests
City/state

Riders affected

Drivers affected

Alabama

0

50

California

13,042,000

261,000

Colorado

0

<50

Delaware

0

200

Florida

0

400

Georgia

0

0

Honolulu, HI

0

0

Bloomington, IL

0

1,000

Chicago, IL

2,462,000

97,000

Iowa

0

<50

Kentucky

0

8,000

Maryland

0

57,000

Canada

 

Please note: values reported have been rounded.

City/province

Riders affected

Drivers affected

Calgary, AB

371,000

5,000

Vancouver, BC

517,000

7,000

Winnipeg, MB

0

800

Barrie, ON

0

1,000

Brampton, ON

0

43,000

Guelph, ON

0

3,000

Hamilton, ON

121,000

15,000

London, ON

0

4,000

Mississauga, ON

601,000

53,000

Niagara, ON

0

1,000

Oakville, ON

0

29,000

Ottawa, ON

383,000

7,000

Download data reported in previous years

H2 2017

H1 2017

H2 2016

Frequently asked questions

  • We produce information that we believe is most relevant to the request and ask that any overly broad requests be narrowed accordingly. In some cases, Uber has challenged overly broad requests in legal proceedings.

  • Not always. But we do ask for this information to ensure that data requests are limited to legitimate regulatory purposes.

  • We have attempted to limit agencies from disclosing commercially or personally sensitive information. But agencies may disregard our requests and complaints, collecting more data than necessary to fulfill their obligations and therefore creating additional risks that this data is publicly exposed. In addition, regulatory agencies may disclose this information through open data portals or when responding to freedom of information requests.

  • Only in some cases. Taxis are not always bound by the same agencies or regulations as Uber is. Depending on the location, the authorities and rules that apply to each type of company may vary.

  • State and local regulators have very different objectives from airport authorities. State and local regulators, like public utility commissions, are responsible for ensuring that certain companies operate in accordance with the applicable regulations, including those governing safety. Airport authorities often defer to state and/or local regulations but may require additional data in order to track and count the number of vehicles on their property.